New Minimally-Invasive Procedure Available for Patients with Dangerous Condition in the Legs Linked to Heart Health

(July 1, 2015) Hot Springs, AR –– National Park Medical Center is the first hospital in the Hot Springs region, and one of only two hospitals in the state of Arkansas to offer a new minimally-invasive procedure to treat peripheral artery disease (PAD) in the upper leg. PAD is a serious and common condition associated with an increased risk for heart attack and stroke. Drug-coated balloons are a new type of medical device used to treat PAD in the upper legs once medical management has failed. The first procedure at National Park Medical Center was performed by Interventional Radiologist, Dr. Lonnie Wright, on Monday, June 29.

“I am very excited to work with NPMC to provide this innovative new therapy to treat PAD in our patients in the Hot Springs area,” said Dr. Wright, who is a physician at Hot Springs Radiology. “Our outcomes thus far have been excellent, and the longer term research is already showing excellent results one year out from the procedure.” The entire team of Interventional Radiologists at Hot Springs Radiology will have the training and access to provide this new therapy at NPMC.

Drug-coated balloons are designed to help restore blood flow by reopening blocked arteries and delivering a medication to the artery wall that clinical studies have shown helps keep the artery open longer than other available therapies. During the procedure, an inflated balloon pushes the plaque away to create a channel for blood flow and the medication on the balloon surface is absorbed into the artery wall. The balloon is then removed with only the medication left behind, which can remain present for up to 6 months.

Affecting an estimated eight to 12 million people in the U.S., PAD is a debilitating disease that occurs when arteries become narrowed or blocked by plaque build-up, restricting blood flow.[i] PAD commonly affects arteries in the upper legs and can cause recurrent and painful muscle cramping in the thigh and/or upper calf. The pain can be described as dull, causing a heaviness or tightness in the muscles, but often will stop when the person is at rest. Experiencing pain, even while at rest or while sleeping, is a sign of a more severe disease. If not properly treated, PAD can lead to life-threatening complications, and is associated with a four to five times higher risk for heart attack or stroke.[ii]

NPMC has chosen to use the IN.PACT Admiral drug-coated balloon by Medtronic because it has demonstrated excellent results in the treatment of PAD in the upper legs. In particular, studies have shown treatment with drug-coated balloons reduces the need to have a similar repeat procedure within the next year, which is more common with other types of interventional procedures for the treatment of the condition.

National Park Medical Center is a full service, 166-bed, acute care facility located at 1910 Malvern Avenue in Hot Springs. Providing care to the surrounding five-county area since 1954, NPMC is fully accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and licensed by the state of Arkansas and approved for the acceptance of Medicare Patients. NPMC is a part of Capella Healthcare, which partners with communities to build strong local healthcare systems that are known for high quality patient care and excellent service. Based in Franklin, Tenn., Capella Healthcare operates under the philosophy that all healthcare is local, Capella collaborates with each hospital’s medical staff, board and community leadership to take care to the next level. The company has access to significant leadership and financial resources, reinvesting 100% of net cash flow into its family of hospitals to strengthen and expand services and facilities.  For additional information on the hospital, contact the marketing office at (501) 620-2705 or visit the website at www.nationalparkmedical.com.

In Photo: National Park Medical Center’s Interventional Radiology team works with the Hot Springs Radiology’s Interventional Radiologists, including Dr. Wright, to treat patients with the InPact drug-coated balloon therapy as pictured here. Team members photographed are Amanda Walker, Mona Murray and Billy Shuffield.

In Photo: National Park Medical Center’s Interventional Radiology team works with the Hot Springs Radiology’s Interventional Radiologists, including Dr. Wright, to treat patients with the InPact drug-coated balloon therapy as pictured here. Team members photographed are Amanda Walker, Mona Murray and Billy Shuffield.

 

[i] National Heart Lung And Blood Institute (Nhlbi). Facts About Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.) (n.d.): n. pag. Web.
[ii] Aboyans, Victor, Ileana Desormais, Philippe Lacroix, Johanna Salazar, Michael H. Criqui, and Marc Laskar. “The General Prognosis of Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease Differs According to the Disease Localization.” JAMA. 55.9 (2010): 898-903.